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Gemstone Index: Peridot

Peridot (pronounced PEAR-ih-doh or PEAR-ih-dot) is created under great temperatures and pressures deep within the Earth, and sometimes is extruded in basaltic lavas. Its yellow-green color is mainly dependent on the amount of ferrous iron present. The traditional birthstone of August, peridot's name origin is uncertain, but several theories exist.

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Gemstone Index: Apatite

The name apatite (aka Asparagus Stone, Berilo) is quite appropriate, considering this mineral makes up the teeth in all vertebrate animals (and teeth are used to satisfy one's appetite!). In fact, it comprises more than 60% of the bones and teeth in humans, fish, birds, cows, and even mammoths and dinosaurs. Apatite is a calcium phosphate that is typically green, but also can be blue, yellow, reddish-brown, violet, yellow-green ("asparagus stone"), colorless or multicolored. Colors often form due to natural irradiation or the presence of rare earth elements. This clear to opaque stone will sometimes show a cat's-eye effect.

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Gemstone Index: Carnelian

Carnelian Gemstone Beads: Carnelian is an A-grade agate. What a lot of people call "true carnelian" is the fiery red/orange color, and in theory, carnelian is naturally that color. However, most of that fiery red/orange "true" carnelian is heat-treated in secret before it reaches the gemstone-cutting factory. This apparently has been a secret for thousands of years; each part of the world thought everyone else's carnelian was naturally red, but they were heating theirs, too. When held against the light, the color-treated carnelian shows its color in stripes, while natural carnelian shows a cloudy distribution of color. Ayurveda holds that carnelian is excellent for the first chakra, and the gemstone is thought to bring passion to the wearer.

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Gemstone Index: Ruby

Ruby Gemstone Beads: From royal crowns to Dorothy's slippers to, of course, delicious jewelry, the ruby is a most desirable gemstone. Its hardness, durability, luster and rarity are among the world's finest, and its blazing red color is beyond compare. Ruby is the red variety of the corundum (aluminum oxide) mineral, a family that also includes sapphire, and takes its name from the Latin rubeus or ruber, meaning "red." Corundum (which sapphires and rubies are comprised of) is the second-hardest natural mineral known to mankind. Pure corundum is colorless; the presence of chromium impurities creates the fiery-colored stone known as ruby, and corundum of any other color is sapphire.

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Gemstone Index: Table of Contents

Discover the Story Behind Each Bead! From geology to metaphysics, this gemstone guide gives insight into the origins and uses of many gemstones that are used as beads. Most entries include: Origin of the stone's name | "Also known as" (aka) names | Chemical composition | Where it is found | Details about industry practices, enhancements, & synthetics | Metaphysical properties | History and fun trivia facts | Care recommendations Learn more about Agate, Amazonite, Amethyst, Carnelian, Emerald, Jade, Jasper, Lava Stone, Moonstone, Onyx, Opal, Opalite, Pearls, Prehnite, Quartz, Rhyolite, Serpentine, Tigereye, Tourmaline...

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Moonlit Walk Ear Threads Tutorial

Create a sweet pair of threader earrings, perfect for June birthstone gifts, using moonstone charms and tiny faceted ombre sunstone beads.

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Chakra Khan Ear Threaders Tutorial

Be your own rainbow, with these sparkling sterling silver threader chain earrings. Create a wire-wrapped cascade of 7 tiny faceted gemstones in purple amethyst, deep lapis lazuli, blue apatite, green aventurine, yellow citrine, peach moonstone and red carnelian.

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Paw Print Necklace Tutorial

For a sweet and simple necklace, just slide a TierraCast paw print pendant onto ball chain, cut chain to desired length (optional), pop the clasp on, and enjoy! No jewelry pliers required.

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Pawrific Enamel Necklace Tutorial

Created by: Summer Melaas. Punch a hole in the top corners of your copper blank. File any sharp bits. Clean with Penny Brite. Cut your 22 ga bare copper wire, and shape the wire pieces into a paw print. Make sure they are flat so that no enamel can run under the wire. Sift your 3 background colors of enamel separately (one color at a time) onto the blank in your desired pattern.

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June Baby Earrings Tutorial

This might be the easiest pair of earrings you ever make! The sweetly sparkly CZs (loose 4mm cubic zirconia stones) are available in all birthstone colors, plus jet black.

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Gemstone Index: Moonstone

Moonstone Gemstone Beads: With its ghostly glow, this feldspar stone almost seems magical. High-quality rainbow moonstone is usually chatoyant and sometimes displays a strong cat's eye. The floating-light phenomenon and sheen of moonstone are called adularescence or schiller. The light is scattered by alternating layers of two kinds of feldspar and produces a misty luster of white, dull yellow, yellow-gray or greenish-gray. The stone's main color also comes in shades of peach and gray. The Romans thought moonstone was formed out of moonlight and began wearing it in jewelry around 100 A.D. The gemstone has always been considered sacred in India, and Europeans of the Middle Ages thought by looking into a moonstone, you would fall into a deep sleep and see the future.

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Cumulus Threader Earrings Tutorial

The long 5" ear threads also allow you to wear the earrings in an asymmetrical fashion, with the pearl balls suspended at different lengths. If you have double pierced ears, the long-chain tail can be swagged back through a second piercing.

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La Terre Threader Earrings Tutorial

These threader earrings are one of our easiest jewelry projects. Just twist open a jump ring, and use it to connect an opal charm to the ear thread's loop. Voila! A lovely pair of long linear earrings, made with box chain.

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Footprints in the Sand Earrings Tutorial

To create these sweet wire-lashed gemstone + sterling silver starfish threader earrings (also known as ear threads), lay out 10 sunstone beads in an ombre pattern. Cut two feet of the 26g wire. Wrap a few tight wraps at the top of the wire part of the ear thread, thread one bead on the wire. Holding the bead tight in place, ...

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Sundance Bolo Tie Necklace Tutorial

Here is a fun and colorful take on the traditional bolo tie, made with hand-dyed silk ribbon and flat-back cameo cabochons. You'll love Mollie's helpful tip for gluing items that won't sit straight... She likes to use a piece of scrunched-up foil to support the cameo and keep it as level as possible.

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Buried Treasure Acorn Earrings Tutorial

Make a pair of color-changing acorn earrings for your favorite squirrely person. String the 4.5mm round corrugated bead onto the head pin. String two rubber earring backs onto the head pin, the first one positioned against the 4.5mm round corrugated bead with the second one positioned about 11mm apart. The earring backs serve as bead adjusters for the large-hole mirage bead. String the Mirage...

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Gemstone Index: Jade

Jade Gemstone Beads: For centuries, the word jade applied to green gemstones brought to Europe from China and Central America. It wasn't until 1863 that society realized the term "jade" was being applied to two different minerals. These two gemstones, nephrite and jadeite, are relatively hard to distinguish from each other, and both are still called jade. Varieties of serpentine have also been confused with jade throughout history, and some serpentine is still called jade. In fact, the Chinese word for jade is applied to a variety of minerals that can be carved, including serpentine, agate and quartz! Our jade beads include true jades, serpentine beads, and...

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Gemstone Index: Serpentine

Serpentine is a lovely green translucent, waxy silicate of magnesium. it is often mistaken for various types of jade, and some stones called "jade" are actually types of serpentine. A major difference between the two semi precious stones is that serpentine is softer and less dense than most real jade. Its name comes from the word "serpent," or snake, perhaps because of its mottled green colors and patterns that can resemble snakeskin. Most of serpentine's history is tied in with the history of jade, as the two were (and are) often confused. Historically, serpentine was thought to protect the wearer from snake bites. Modern mystics say...

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Little Sprout Necklace Tutorial

Find step-by-step illustrated instructions showing how to engrave a pendant with an easy-to-use Micro Engraver, and create a sweet design using a rubber stamp as your template.

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Gemstone Index: Lava Stone

Black lava stone beads are cut from basalt, a type of igneous rock formed during volcanic eruptions. Due to their holes and bubbles, lava stone beads add great texture, but not a lot of weight, to jewelry designs. Lava stone is naturally rough in texture, and our beads appear to be treated with a paraffin wax to make them smooth to the touch - plain basalt would be rather abrasive! Lava stone beads are a great base for Art Clay Silver paste and other Metal Clay pastes - just be sure to burn off the waxy coating in a kiln first. Natural lava (basalt) is only available in shades of black and brown. All white and other colors that are commercially sold as lava are a similar stone (likely pumice, which is also volcanic). Due to their unknown makeup, we don't recommend heating white "lava".

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