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Author Topic: How to permanently close a jump ring?  (Read 33845 times)
cekman
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Cobweb Corner


« on: January 29, 2006, 02:20:16 pm »

I'm making watch pendant necklaces.  I'm using standard watch faces and have one side of the watch attached to the wire for the necklace. Then I want to add 'fringe' to the end of the watch. I'm using head pins to make the fringe and then am using a jump ring to attach it to the watch face.

What I want to know is what do I do to the jump ring so it won't open and allow the fringe pieces to come off?  Actually I'm wondering if I even NEED to close it permanently. When I look at I think it will be fine - but if I give it a good tug the ring starts to open then I worry there will be problems - what does everyone else do?

I really don't want to get into soldering.  Can I use a glue or cement of some kind? Here is a picture to hopefully help describe what I mean.



Also - do I need to worry about the guage of the jump ring?

Thank you for any help!
Carla

http://www.cobweb-corner.com
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Luann Udell
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2006, 05:34:57 pm »

A heavier gauge ring won't open as easily.  

Sometimes it's a question of using heavier-gauge headpins for the dangles, so they aren't thin enough to fall through the gap in the jumpring.

Good quality jumprings won't open as easily.
  
Work-hardening the jump ring a little (by lightly tapping or wriggling it open & closed GENTLY a few times) may stiffen it a bit and make it harder to open.

Using an OVAL jumpring will keep the open part on the side and the dangles on the bottom.

Other than that, ya gotta soddah....  (sigh.)  

Your jumpring looks a little chewed in the photo--is that a trick of the light, or are those tool marks?  If so, you may be opening the jumpring the wrong way, by pulling the ends apart and deforming the ring (though it looks good and round in the photo.)  Jumprings should be gently opened "sideways" without actually widening the space between the two ends.

Hope this helps,
Luann
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Luann Udell
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Luann Udell
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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2006, 05:36:08 pm »

P.S.  You could also use a split ring, but I find they tend to catch on loose threads in fabric.  They always caught my hair when I used them on necklaces (and when my hair was longer!)  '<img'>
Luann
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Luann Udell
"Ancient Stories Retold in Modern Artifacts"
Wall hangings, sculpture and jewelry inspired by prehistoric and tribal art
Luann's website
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Metalman
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2006, 11:34:36 am »

Luann has some good points.  Gauge, which is the thickness, and thereby the strength of the jump. There are a variety of 'cold connection' methods you might be able to design with and adapt to your work if  security continues to be a concern.
I recommend 'The Complete Metalsmith' by Tim McCreight [R&T# 62-010]
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Metalman
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synthesire
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2006, 11:51:20 am »

wow. this is great information. I've been doing all wrong. The Metalman is definately definately right about a couple of things. thanks again!
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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2006, 12:19:16 pm »

How would you solder the jump ring in this piece and protect the work above? I've just set up my mini torch and my experience is with plain silver smithing, not parts that need protecting from the flame.
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Metalman
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« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2006, 02:24:48 pm »

You mention a mini torch but not the brand.
There is a very hot torch with a very[very,very] small flame called 'The Little Torch'  The flame is small enough that you can use a clamp to hold up the jump ring and spot solder just the jump ring.  Nice torch - full set-up is about $400
Metalsmithing tool suppliers and welding shops in your home town
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Metalman
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fierceviolet
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« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2006, 01:33:24 pm »

A discussion today raised this topic once again, and it's worthwhile to mention that we do also have a micro torch available in our own stock that is frequently used for soldering such things as jump rings and wire. as explained by russ, it fires hot enough to solder smaller findings such as those mentioned above, but "can't do large object brazing" like the little torch kurt has mentioned.

this item is stock #69-180.  '<img'>
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Russ Nobbs
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« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2006, 11:29:33 am »

A simple solution is to use 2 jumprings.  it's unlikely that the openings in both will be aligned in the same direction so a pull is less likely to open both.

if the work was in white or silver color you could use soft tin/silver solder, like sta-brit or tix. these soft, low temperature solders flow with an electric soldering iron. a torch is not required. sta-brite would keep the the regular jump ring from opening.  but they are silver colored - not suitable for gold colored work.
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Russ Nobbs
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Carol R.
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« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2006, 01:07:16 pm »

There is also a jump-ring out there called 'Snap-ezz', no soldering necessary.  I'm not sure if I spelled it correctly, it is made by the makers of the" tornado crimp" which by the way, is another great crimp out there.  It has quite a nice fancy look to it.  I think the website is www.tornadocrimp.com, if not google will help find it.  Hope this will be of some help! Carol R.
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Carol R.
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« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2006, 01:20:47 pm »

The website for the "Snapeez" jump ring that will click shut is www.viamurano.com
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mscarpa
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« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2010, 11:49:45 am »

When soldering, you can use KoolJool or something like it to protect the stones.

Ganoksin.com has an archive of excellent Jewelry Making articles. There's one called "Protecting Gems When Soldering" at http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nenam/soldering-with-gems.htm
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TaoGem
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« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2010, 09:56:01 pm »

<font color='#000080'>The website for the "Snapeez" jump ring that will click shut is <a href="http://www.viamurano.com" target="_blank">www.viamurano.com[/url]</font>

Thanks for the link Carol..

I too have a bit of a time soldering closed a jump ring.. These are really nice !
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Russ Nobbs
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« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2010, 10:22:39 pm »

The SNAPEEZ (r) jump rings don't exactly "snap" shut the way the name implies.

They are a slightly heavier jump ring and Via Murano  teaches a method of twisting them back and forth with 2 pliers a couple of times and sliding the 2 ends together. The process work hardens the jump ring and gives a very tight closure.

You can get similar results using their method with any jump ring and have less gap than just closing them the regular way.
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Russ Nobbs
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matekat
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« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2011, 10:46:06 pm »

If so, you may be opening the jumpring the wrong way, by pulling the ends apart and deforming the ring .
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