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Author Topic: Tiger tail v's beadalon  (Read 5892 times)
Chezz
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« on: February 05, 2005, 05:23:58 pm »

Hi everyone  '<img'>

I am wondering if someone could please tell me what the difference is between tiger tail and beadalon?

I always have used tiger tail but seems beadalon is quite popular so would like to know more about it.

I find tiger tail to be quite good, altho seems to stay in a curved shape from being on the roll. I can't get nice straight peices for drop earrings and things like that.

Chezz
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Kaytee
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« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2005, 08:02:20 am »

>>I am wondering if someone could please tell me what the difference is between tiger tail and beadalon?<<

The "low end" (7 strand) Beadalon IS tigertail; usually better than generic tigertail, but still... "low end". I use it for "practice" stringing (trying out various sequences, or an unfinished sequence), and to store large "loose" beads.

The 21 and 49 strand Beadalon or Soft Flex (another brand) is more supple, as well as less likely to kink and break. Worth the extra cost in most cases.
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Chezz
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2005, 02:43:38 am »

Thanks for the reply Kaytee, much appreciated  '<img'>

So with the 21 & 49 size beadalon, is it like wire or more like that stretchy type of thread? I believe it can be knotted so am thinking it's got some sort of stretch to it. Does it hang stiffish like tiger tail or more like a thread?

Chezz
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Luann Udell
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2005, 06:33:36 am »

No stretch, just "softer"--and it's not as stiff as tiger tail but not as drapey as thread.

Why don't you get one of the smaller sized rolls (I think they're 30 ft.) and try it out yourself?  Since you seem to have specific uses in mind, it would probably be best if you just tried some in those designs.

It's wonderful stuff--strong yet lightweight, doesn't kink, fairly unobstrusive in most designs, comes in lots of colors so it can really disappear or really stand out in your work.  It's more expensive than tigertail, but not THAT expensive, and you'll get the extra cost back in fewer repairs and returns for broken necklaces.

I've ONLY used the 49 strand stuff, but this works well even with pearls.  I've never used the 21 strand stuff, but you KNOW it's going to be at least 3x stronger than the 7 strand tigertail!  

To make your decision more confusing, there are actually several brands of the stuff.  I think Soflex was first, then there's Beadalon and C-flex, and a no-name brand that Fire Mountain Gem sells.  I've heard they all have their individual characteristics, but I've used all four & just tend to grab whatever's on hand!  I don't think I've ever had a single necklace break that I've made with them.  Oh, a very ornate design pulled apart, but it turned out that was actually because I'd used an unsoldered jumpring, and the cord just pulled through the break.

Hope this helps,
Luann
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Luann Udell
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Chezz
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2005, 05:00:34 pm »

Thank you for the explanation!

I might see if I can find some in my local bead shop and see for myself, sounds like it could be very good!

Chezz
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2006, 02:06:31 pm »

Hi
I saw a question in this message thread about knotting beadalon but no answer - so hoping someone will give me some advice.

Can you/should you knot Beadalon?

I worry that crimping won't hold the beadalon forever, so I always end up knotting the beadalon after passing it over a soldered closed ring and some gimp (french wire/bullion).

But I don't like the way it looks and end up having to cover it with a crimp bead cover.

Do any professionals have any idea about if this is right or wrong way to do things?

Will beadalon, well-crimped, really last?

Thanks
Sarah
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Luann Udell
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2006, 03:47:04 pm »

Oh boy, need to find a big chunka wood to knock on....

To date, a Beadalon crimp closure, properly done (good crimp action, quality crimp--I only use sterling silver or gold-filled crimps--and proper size crimp for the job) has never given way.  In about ten years of making necklaces and bracelets.

That I know of, of course!  :^)  But I've never had a customer return one for repairs that was because of a crimp giving way.

And although I'm careful to use mostly tube crimps (so they squash flat and don't cut through the plastic lining on the Beadalon) I've never had a crimp cut through the plastic and damage the wire strands.

Anyone else want to "testify"?  
Luann
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Luann Udell
"Ancient Stories Retold in Modern Artifacts"
Wall hangings, sculpture and jewelry inspired by prehistoric and tribal art
Luann's website
Luann's blog
Luann's art jewelry shop
Luann's more whimsical jewelry shop
scaffnet
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« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2006, 12:36:59 pm »

Hi Luann,

I've been using Beadalon 49 strand for a few years now and I am having two problems that you say you are not having!

1. I cannot get the wire through many of the pearls I have purchased at R&T Trunk Shows. Very frustrating! I have some strands of pearls that I simply cannot use in my bracelets. Or I have to downgrade to thinner, weaker wire.

2. I did have a bracelet break, fortunately it was my wife's (she wore it daily for about 2 years) but still, it broke!

So, any suggestions for stronger, thinner wire out there??

Mark

PS you have a lovely website, I especially like the faux stones.
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Luann Udell
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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2006, 04:37:13 pm »

Well, since you complimented my work, I have to answer...   '<img'>

Re: The bracelet breaking, the only thing I could think of is from another thread.  Polly or Mary (Huh?) said that there's a delicate balance between a crimp that's been squished too hard and not hard enough.  Too hard, and the crimp cuts through the plastic.  Not hard enough, and it isn't tight enough to hold everything.

It's possible that if there's a lot of movement in the bracelet, that the crimp could still rub against the cord and eventually cut through.  OR a metal bead, or a rough edge on a glass bead, will do the same thing.  

I always worry about this, but then, I worry about everything.    Where is the emoticon with worry pludes?

Now, some thoughts about your first question.  What weight/width of Beadalon are you using for pearls?  It comes in several thicknesses, starting at 13# (break point) through 26# and the thickest is 40#.  (I see in a catalog that 20# and 60# weight have been added....)  

The weights also correspond to different thicknesses.  So MAYBE if you tried a lighter weight/finer diameter of Beadalon, you'll find it works for those R&T pearls.

I usually skip the 13# and use the 26# for most necklaces, and the 40# for heavier & larger designs.  I know the 26# will go through every pearl hole I've tried, so I'm guessing the 13# would work for even the very smallest pearl holes.

And if that doesn't work....well, R&T sells a really nifty battery-powered bead reamer, too!

There!  I think we've successfully linked three threads.
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Luann Udell
"Ancient Stories Retold in Modern Artifacts"
Wall hangings, sculpture and jewelry inspired by prehistoric and tribal art
Luann's website
Luann's blog
Luann's art jewelry shop
Luann's more whimsical jewelry shop
Luann Udell
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2006, 04:39:38 pm »

Forgot to add that I've never knotted Beadalon, though I've read you can.  But I've never really seen how it's done or what it looks like.  If I'm really nervous about it, I use two crimps on each end, and hide them in crimp covers (though I worry that the crimp cover could cause some wear and tear on the Beadalon, too.)  (I TOLD you I worry about everything....)

Hope all this helps, I hit the "post" button too soon in my last post.
Luann
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Luann Udell
"Ancient Stories Retold in Modern Artifacts"
Wall hangings, sculpture and jewelry inspired by prehistoric and tribal art
Luann's website
Luann's blog
Luann's art jewelry shop
Luann's more whimsical jewelry shop
scaffnet
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2006, 12:16:44 pm »

Hi Luanne,

Thanks for the suggestions. I'm in a pickle as I like to mix pearls with my own silver beads, which are likely the culprit in terms of wearing through that 49 cord. I make the holes as smooth as I can, but friction eventually wins.

And reaming beads is a pain!

Take care,

Mark
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