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Author Topic: best metal to metal adhesive  (Read 6762 times)
mamaduck
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« on: August 04, 2009, 09:02:17 pm »

Hi everyone,

I am hoping for some advice please?

I need to adhere vintage enamel to a metal earring post (4mm).

I have tried E6000, and whilst this works, it is not as durable as I need it to be and I have found quite a few posts have come unstuck. Can anyone suggest a better adhesive please. I was thinking a two part epoxy may be more suitable.

I am an international customer so need something that can be shipped, or purchased in Australia.

Thanks in advance.  smile

Alison
« Last Edit: August 04, 2009, 09:10:46 pm by mamaduck » Logged
Russ Nobbs
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2009, 10:27:06 am »

E6000 is particularly good if there is some flex required.

I'd suggest a 2 part epoxy for metal to metal adhesive.  We have several. Our own Rings & Things epoxy and the Hughes 24 hour Epoxy 220 are the strongest.
See Epoxy Page for details. Sadly, these are both classes as hazardous and can't be shipped to  you.

I'd think you could find similar products closer to home in a hardware store. The Hughes product is common in rock and lapidary shops in the US and might be available at similar shops  in Australia.

Depending on the metals and the type of enamel, you could also consider low temperature, tin based jewelry solder like Tix and STAY-BRITE. These are also often sold in lapidary shops.
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Russ Nobbs
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« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2009, 11:02:32 pm »

Let's be real. the reason it broke in the first place is because it is in a high stress area of the frame. I am imagining a bond line that is relatively thin/narrow. For this application, your only shot at attempting to fix with a glue is a 2 part epoxy system. If you can, choose one that is 'toughened'. In other words, it has a lower Young's modulus resulting in more flexibility before failure. You don't necessarily want a soft epoxy, just one that can take some shock and stress.
I think mechanical means are necessary in this app (without being able to see it). I would highly recommend a plate and some machine screws to hold the frame together. You could use the epoxy to adhere the plates to the frame- this would give you the surface area you need insure the epoxy does not give.
pearl jewelry
« Last Edit: September 01, 2009, 08:16:40 am by daverobertson » Logged
daverobertson
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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2009, 08:18:02 am »

Now that's the sort of thorough reply we hope for!

Thanks Arvel  Not Worthy
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Luann Udell
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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2009, 10:23:21 am »

It's not universally known, but even epoxies--and especially E6000--have a shelf life.  Not as bad as bread, of course.

Years ago, I was looking for reliable adhesives for some jewelry pieces.  Everyone always raved about E6000, and I always had issues with it.  When I called the company, they said it's possible I was getting "old" tubes!

Maybe things have improved since then, but I believe they actually said the glue would lose potency after a year or so--I think the term "six months" was even bandied about!  If you figure how long the stuff takes to get packed, leave the plant, get shipped across the country, sit at a distributor's warehouse, get ordered by a store, sit on a shelf & then get toted home by a customer, put on a shelf, pulled out a few times for use (adding air to the mixture every time it's opened), and how hot/cold some of those situations are, it makes sense.

I now only buy very small bottles of superglue for this reason, and I try not to stockpile epoxy.   Cheesy
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Luann Udell
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Polly
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« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2009, 11:44:38 am »

I have some product testing results:

I still own about 5 pairs of earrings that were glued with Rings & Things 24-hour epoxy in the 1980's!  It's true, I haven't worn them very much since the 80's, but I'm impressed that the glue bond hasn't broken.  

E6000 is a wonderfully convenient product -- I use it frequently around the house. However, most of my items that are glued with E-6000 need a repair after 1 year.

Mamaduck, click through to the product details for either of the glues linked above, and take a look at the "Too many glues! How do I pick?" column.  It will help you figure out which category of glue is best for your purposes, and then hopefully you can find some locally.  Also, some of our glues are shippable internationally.  Click through the various categories of glues on this page, and avoid anything that the "HZ" symbol next to it.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2009, 11:48:30 am by Polly » Logged

Polly Nobbs-LaRue
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« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2009, 09:44:22 am »

Thanks Polly, it's good to know I'm not the only person in the world with "issues" about E6000!   Oo
So not only does it have a short SHELF life, it has a short WORKING life....
I think I bought some 24-hour epoxy from R&T awhile ago, but I think I've let it sit too long.  Any idea how long its shelf life is? Many products lose their oomph if they are opened & then sit on the shelf too long again...   oops
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Luann Udell
"Ancient Stories Retold in Modern Artifacts"
Wall hangings, sculpture and jewelry inspired by prehistoric and tribal art
Luann's website
Luann's blog
Luann's art jewelry shop
Luann's more whimsical jewelry shop
Polly
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« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2009, 10:28:19 am »

I've had pretty good luck using old E6000, but it doesn't hold quite as well as when it is new.  Some of that, however, has been a controllable factor:  When I'm using an old tube of E6000, I'm normally doing household or quick personal-jewelry-so-I-can-wear-it-today types of repairs, and haven't always cleaned my surfaces well.  I've had a lot of failures with these quick repairs.  Once I clean them up better, the E6000 has held decently again.

And by the time they need another repair, I've purchased a new tube of glue.

Generally when I'm doing those quick repairs using old glue -- I've left a tube sitting around way too long, and I can't get any more out of the nozzle, and have to break a crease in the tube open and use it from the side (hopefully that makes sense ... I mean like old toothpaste tubes used to break near the bottom and ooze out the side -- I'll do that on purpose with old E6000 tubes).  And when that doesn't work?  The glue is waaaay too old.
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Polly Nobbs-LaRue
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