Posts Tagged ‘riveting’

Best Riveting Tool Set

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

With 100s of rivets, eyelets, and related tools to pick from, the #2 riveting question I get is:

What are the best tools to easily
set both rivets and eyelets?

The answer depends on whether you want to rivet mostly leather, or mostly metal.

For leather, see my Riveting with TierraCast Leather Findings tutorial.


For metal and mixed media, the best set of riveting tools is…

This combination for 1/16″ diameter rivets and eyelets:

1/16" Long Reach Rivet Tool

#69-907 1/16″ Long Reach Piercing/Riveting Tool
– one end pierces; the other end sets 1/16″ rivets

1/16" Long Reach Reverse Rivet Flaring Set

#69-990 1/16″ Long Reach Reverse Rivet Flaring Set - for riveting tightly curved items, like rings and bangles

1/16" domed piercing base

#69-902 1/16″ domed piercing base – for piercing curved items

Fidget (hinged book pin) made with 1/16" eyelets and rivets

Fidget (hinged book pin) made with 1/16″ eyelets and rivets

Live with Intention - Cuff Bracelet (made with domed piercing base and reverse riveting accessory)

Live with Intention – Cuff Bracelet (made with domed piercing base and reverse riveting accessory)

Plus this combination for 3/32″ diameter rivets and eyelets:

Long Reach 3/32 Riveting Tool

#69-993 3/32″ Long Reach Piercing/Riveting Tool –one end pierces 3/32″ holes; other end sets 3/32″ rivets

3/32" Long Reach Reverse Rivet Flaring Set

#69-996 3/32″ Long Reach Reverse Rivet Flaring Set — for riveting tightly curved items, like rings and bangles

3/32" Domed Piercing Base

#69-905 3/32″ Domed Piercing Base – for piercing curved items

Cities in Bloom Bracelet

Cities in Bloom – etched bracelet with 3/32″ eyelets

This list of riveting tools allows you to pierce 1/16″ and 3/32″ holes without having to trade piercing bases all the time, and easily set 1/16″ and 3/32″ rivets and eyelets on flat and sharply curved items.

If you plan on riveting only flat items, then skip the domed piercing bases and reverse riveting tools.

The Long Reach tools listed above allow you to rivet items from approximately 0.5mm to 11mm (1/32″ – 7/16″) thick.  If you’re only going to work on thin items (up to about 6mm or 1/4″), you can save a few dollars by getting these tools in standard (original) length instead of long reach.  (See the full list of Crafted Findings riveting tools. If something is out of stock, here’s a tip: You can use Long Reach accessories in the standard/original base, but you can NOT use standard accessories in the Long Reach base.)

Old-school wire riveting uses a different set of tools, which you can find here.  But the question I’m answering in today’s blog is “What are the best tools to easily set both rivets and eyelets?”

Optional Nifty Gadgets:

A swivel vise is also handy.

A swivel vise is nice; it holds the riveting tool, keeping your hands free

A swivel vise is handy for holding the riveting tool at the angle of your choice, freeing your hands for slippery stacks of items to be riveted.

And I love these colorful little tins for storing assorted rivets and eyelets:

Color metal storage tins

Colorful metal storage tins for holding tiny rivets and eyelets — My favorite is the set of 20.

 

Which brings me to question #3:

What sizes of rivets and eyelets are best to start with?

Definitely the assortments — one of each size — because then no matter what new project you start, you’ll have the right length. The color choices are copper, brass, and aluminum. If it’s a toss-up for you, I recommend copper. It’s the easiest to polish or antique, and is a nice accent for any color of metal. Or brass, because all the eyelets are brass.

1/16″ diameter rivet assortments

Short (1/16, 3/32, 1/8 and 5/32" long)

Short (1/16, 3/32, 1/8 and 5/32″ long)

Medium (3/16, 7/32, 1/4, 9/32 and 5/16")

Medium (3/16, 7/32, 1/4, 9/32 and 5/16″)

Long (11/32, 3/8, 13/32, 7/16 and 15/32" long)

Long (11/32, 3/8, 13/32, 7/16 and 15/32″ long)

1/16″ diameter eyelets

3/32″ diameter rivet assortments

Assorted 3/32" Rivets

Short (1/16, 3/32, 1/8 and 5/32″ long)

Medium 3/32" Rivet Assortment

Medium (3/16, 7/32, 1/4, 9/32 and 5/16″ long)

Long (11/32, 3/8, 13/32, 7/16 and 15/32" long)

Long (11/32, 3/8, 13/32, 7/16 and 15/32″ long)

3/32″ diameter eyelets

Oh, and the #1 riveting question is: What’s the difference between all these types of rivets and eyelets?

I hope this helps you pick the ideal riveting tools for the projects you have in mind!

~Polly

Feel free to post questions below!

 

Create a Hinged Metal Memory Journal

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

Use a hinge to turn shrine-shaped metal blanks into a journal!

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Hinged Book Necklace made with shrine-shaped metal blanks

Decide on the layout, location of the hinge and other decorative elements. Using a checkered hammer, apply texture to the top and bottom panels of the journal. Patina, file rough edges and clean.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Layout

Cut the hinges, which can be as wide or as narrow as you choose. For 3/32 tubing, make hinges that are one-half inch deep. You need an odd number of hinge tabs. Measure, mark and saw tabs into the top panel. Use plenty of cut lube to prevent the saw blade from sticking when cornering.  
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Create Hinge Tabs

Using wide, flat nose pliers, crease and fold each tabs up to a 90 degree angle. The position of the fold determines whether the hinge will be visible from the front of the pendant, or only from the back side. Keep the textured sides face up, so the design is consistent.
Carefully roll tabs into cylinders using chain nose pliers or medium bail making pliers. Leave hinges a bit loose until after you have inserted the tubing, then you can tighten for best fit. 
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Roll Into Cylinders

Use a tube cutting jig to cut a length of tube 1mm longer than the width of your piece (for 1/2mm on each side).  
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Cut Tubing

Slide tubing down the channel and finesse hinges as needed. Rivet tubing into place to finish the hinge. Open and close hinge to ensure a proper fit.

This free DIY jewelry design by Sondra Barrington features antique brass, nickel silver, metal etching, dapping and creating hinges.

Assemble Hinge and Insert Tubing

Working with the bottom panel, lay out etched metal pieces for the cover and inside page. Cut, file and patina as necessary. Leave sufficient room for the hinge to lay flat against the bottom panel.  
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Lay out Etched Metal Page

Measure, mark and punch holes for decorative rivets, accents and center piece (using the small side of the hole punch).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Prepare Embellishments

Using two-part epoxy, carefully glue the etched metal panels into place.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting. Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design. The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Lay out Etched Metal Page

Using a dapping set, dome two small round shapes that can nest one inside the other. Patina, file away any rough edges and clean the domed metal. Layer, and rivet domed metal nests onto the top panel. Connect top and bottom panel with rivets. Use a tube rivet at the top so that you can thread a jump ring through it (if you choose).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Rivet Domes Into Place

Carefully clean and polish the pendant before attaching the necklace chain.

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Clean Finished Pendant

Handmade jewelry looks great on a custom beaded necklace, on leather cordingsilk ribbon or chain. I created a necklace by making individual links using the one-step looping plier, eye pins, metal beads and natural agates. The links were connected using jump rings.

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Memory Journal Necklace

This free DIY Memory Journal pendant was created by designer Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This necklace features riveting, metal etching, antique brass shrine stamping blanks, dapping, and metal stamping. The chain was created in an ombre pattern using natural agate gemstone beads, TierraCast antique brass bead caps, metal heishi trade beads and the one-step looping plier with antique copper head pins.

Create a Healing Shrine

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

Making handmade jewelry for someone is a unique and inspiring way to show you care.  This “Healing Shrine” was created for a friend suffering from cancer.  It was inspired by our new brass blank shapes and a recent trip to Santa Fe, NM.

An antique brass "Healing Shrine" created for a friend suffering from cancer. The glass vial is filled with 'holy dirt' from a sacred site purported to have healing powers.

Healing Shrine

Each year, thousands of people pilgrimage to El Santuario de Chimayo seeking blessings.  Many visitors take a small amount of “holy dirt” from the site, in hopes of a miraculous cure for themselves or someone who could not make the trip.  I chose to encase my “holy dirt” in a glass portal, that I nested inside a brass reliquary.  Following are instructions for how-to create this DIY jewelry design using stacked brass layers and cold connections.

First, envision your shrine and decide how you want it to look and feel.  Decide on contents for your glass bottle.  Unscrew the top loop from the cork in the glass vial.  Measure, mark and punch holes for rivets (using the small side of the hole punch).

Stamp word “heal” on the metal band designed to hold the glass vial.  Measure the band to ensure that it is going to fit.

Measure metal band to fit glass vial

Measure and bend metal band to fit glass vial

Using bail making pliers, bend the center of the band into a curved shape, leaving each end flat.  Cut to shorten as needed.  File the ends.

Arrange pieces and punch metal

Arrange pieces and punch metal

Rivet the stamped metal band into place after double-checking that it will snugly hold the glass once it is assembled.

Punch holes and rivet band to hold bottle

Rivet the band into place (to hold the vial)

Insert tube rivets in holes between the front and back of shrine, stacking copper heishi trade beads between the layers (to fill the space and strengthen the connection between the top and bottom layers).

Use metal heishi beads as spacers between the layers of metal.

Heishi beads as spacers between layers

  Rivet them into place.  Note: Be careful, it is very difficult to reinstall the heishi spacer beads if they fall off the tubes!

Place all metal heishis before riveting back panel into place

Place all  heishi beads before riveting together

Patina and clean.  Using two-part epoxy, attach a magnet to the back side of the shrine.  Carefully fill vial with contents.

Fill the bottle and install it into reliquary

Fill the vial and pop it into place

Once the glue has cured, pop the glass vial inside the band.  This DIY jewelry project can be a pendant, magnet or pin.

Riveting with TierraCast Leather Findings

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

The links, beads and rivets in TierraCast’s new Leather Findings Collection are refreshingly easy to use — especially for those of you who are still nursing bruised fingertips from my previous riveting blog!

Spiral Lagoon Bracelet

Leather snap bracelet with TierraCast rivets and spiral components.  (Instructions)

 

Setting TierraCast compression rivets:

This video tutorial by Tracy Gonzales of TierraCast shows how quick and easy these rivets are to set:

If the video above doesn’t display for you, try this link:
Technique: Setting Compression Rivets or just keep reading!

Supplies needed for setting compression rivets:

How to set TierraCast (or any) compression rivets:

  1. Punch holes in leather at desired spots (it can be helpful to mark them with a pencil or a Sharpie)

    Rotary Leather Hole Punch

    Leather Hole Punch

  2. Set the post (long portion) on the block.
  3. Add your items to the post.
  4. Slide the (domed) cap over the post.

    Rivet Setter How-to

    How to set compression rivets

  5. Make sure everything is aligned nice and straight (and that you’re looking at the top of your bracelet/item).
  6. Place the cupped end of the rivet setter on the rivet cap.
  7. Tap once or twice with the brass hammer.

    Tap the rivet setter a couple times with a brass hammer.

    Tap the rivet setter a couple times with a brass hammer.

  8. Test: If the rivet is wiggly … you didn’t compress (hammer) it hard enough, so line it up and hammer again!

What other embellishments can you add?

Anything with a 2.4 – 3mm hole, and total stacking height between 2mm and 4.5mm.

Just OK Corral Bracelet by Mollie Valente

Just OK Corral Bracelet by Mollie Valente, with DecoEmbossed oval Vintaj connector. (Instructions)

Samba Scarlet Smile Bracelet

Scarlet leather bracelet with “Smile” stamped on the back of a Rock & Roll link, and with misc. beads riveted on as embellishments. (Instructions)

Diameter / Hole Size:

  • TierraCast rivets have a 2.3-2.5mm diameter post, so any bead or finding that has 2.5mm hole  fits nicely onto the rivet.
  • Beads with a 3/32″ (2.38mm) hole usually fit too. If they are close, briefly use a bead reamer.
  • Beads with a 3mm hole may wiggle or fit a bit loose, but are usually ok.

Length / Height:

  • Items with a total stacked height of 2.5-4mm are perfect, but a range of roughly 1.5-4.5mm thick (total) can work.

Examples:

  • 2 pieces of 2mm leather = 4mm = perfect!
  • A layer of 2mm leather + a 1.5mm-thick link = 3.5mm = perfect!
  • A plain rivet embellishing a single layer of 1.5mm leather = ok, but a little loose
  • A layer of 2mm leather + a 2.5mm-thick bead or washer = usually ok, but pushing the limits.
14mm flower with 2.5mm hole - great for stacking or riveting

14mm flower w/ 2.5mm hole

And, to wrap it up — here are some of my favorite things that fit TierraCast’s rivets, but aren’t part of their official leather findings collection:

~Polly

p.s. Still to come: Riveting with Crafted Findings riveting system. In the meantime, here is a PDF with general tips and tool comparisons.

Upcycle cans and tins into jewelry!

Friday, October 7th, 2011

Metal shears, a metal tin and the completed metal pin!

We all know recycling is a good thing, but upcycling is even better! Aluminum and tin cans can easily be turned into jewelry, but there are a couple of things to keep in mind:

  1. Metal edges can be wicked sharp. Make clean cuts and file off any jagged points. Quality jewelry metal shears make this much easier! Most tin snips and other shears from hardware stores are difficult to grip.
  2. Aluminum cans and most tins are too thin to be durable enough for jewelry by themselves. We suggest layering the metal you cut from recycled items. Three ways of doing this are riveting, gluing and/or coating the metal pieces.

Here are a few examples of how to turn packaging into lovely adornments:

pollys-tin-pins

Polly's tin pins and pendants

Polly sandwiched her recycled metal elements between brass fairy doors, disks and gears. She riveted the pieces together using Crafted Findings’ riveting tool. Learn more about the riveting tool system here.

soda pop can necklace

The holes are lined with large eyelets from a scrapbooking supplier.

For this Soda Pop necklace, we cut disks out of cans and then glued them to brass disks to make them thicker. A circle template makes this task  easier. Get more info in our design gallery.

soda can bobby pins

Layers of flowers punched from soda cans form these fun bobby pins.

Instructions for how Toni coated these pins with liquid polymer clay to make them safe to wear are in our design gallery.

Start looking at soda cans and other product packaging in a different way! I for one always check the bottle cap design when deciding on a beverage.

How I wish every city had an Upcycle Exchange Market. It is a brilliant idea for reusing and redistributing crafty supplies and recyclables! Until then, ask your friends and family to help collect interesting materials for you. You might just upcycle something wonderful!

Riveting tool comparison – long reach vs. standard

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011
riveted-jewelry

One of these things is not like the others…

Hello, bloglandia! Today, I failed repeatedly at the project I undertook with the Crafted Findings semi-tubular riveting tool. But, as many wise people have stated, wisdom rarely comes from success. It is our failures that we learn the most from. And besides, these particular failures were actually wins in a way.

Top: standard riveting tool. Bottom: Long-reach version.

The riveting tool by Crafted Findings is now available in both regular and long-reach models.*   “Long reach” is a misnomer, in my opinion – the tool doesn’t reach any further from the edge of a piece (darn!). Instead, the tool opening is 0.2″ (5mm) “deeper” (taller) which allows thicker pieces to be stacked and riveted together.

The Crafted Findings riveting setup is really quite nifty.  When you make rivets the traditional way, there is a lot work involved in making the holes the right size for the rivets, and the rivets the right size and height for the holes. This tool eliminates that challenge. Simply pierce the metal with one side of the tool, then set the rivet with the other side. All the parts are designed to fit perfectly together. Here is a sneak peek at the instruction book included with the tool.

I’ve used the standard tool on several thin brass fairy door pieces, but nothing very thick. So, my goal today was to make something that could only be riveted with the new long reach riveting tool.

Riveted enameled copper ring. I stamped “eternal” on the band – hoping for eternal summer I guess!

First, I made a ring using C-Koop enameled flowers and a 1/4″ strip of copper sheet metal. It seemed like it was fairly thick (about 1/3″ or 9mm at the outside high points), but it actually fit just fine in the standard riveting tool. (I did have to use an eyelet instead of a rivet, though – the longest eyelet available is 7/32″, while the rivets only go up to 5/32″.)

Be gentle when you rivet breakable items – enamel is a coating of glass, so it can crack if you are overly enthusiastic with the rivet tool.

Second, I made a ring using a domed brass disk, a domed copper gear and a strip of copper. Seemed thick! But again, I was able to rivet it together with the standard tool (and a 5/32″ rivet). (My rivet is kinda squashed looking – unfortunately, the only way to rivet rings is with the unfinished side up. Normally I put the tube side of the rivet on the back of a piece in case it doesn’t look so nice. It is less likely to look squashed if you have the correct length rivet, too.  And I learned…**)

Get in Gear – domed copper and brass.

By now I was both pleased and annoyed: pleased that the standard riveting tool is actually quite versatile, yet annoyed that I had failed at my mission. I didn’t want to make my own eyelets from tubing, so my project needed to fit the 7/32″ eyelet, yet be taller than the standard riveting tool.

The coin already had this lovely patina right out of the bag, so I left the raw brass elements plain for contrast.

Third time’s a charm! I stacked a pin back, brass petal wheel, Chinese coin, domed brass gear and a couple rivet accents together for this pin. Too tall for the standard riveting tool, yet short enough at the center to fit a 7/32″ eyelet. Finally!

The back of the pin – just one eyelet secures it all together. No glue!

Once I found the magic combination of parts, I began thinking of all types of designs where the “long reach”  riveting tool would be handy. 3/32″ long-reach attachments are coming soon, so if you haven’t purchased a Crafted Findings riveting system yet, I’d recommend getting the long reach version.***  For a couple extra bucks, it will ensure you have the most design options. But, as my failures demonstrate, there is still a lot you can do with the standard riveting tool!

This picture shows the height difference between the long reach and regular riveting tools.

Have you made something with the Crafted Findings riveting tool? We’d love to see pictures! ~Cindy

_________________

*The tool is also available in both 1/16″ and 3/32″ diameter options. I used 1/16″ for all of my examples today, but if you plan to use your eyelet holes as connection points (like for jump rings), get the 3/32″ size components (sold separately). Only very fine gauge wire will fit through the 1/16″ eyelets, and no jump rings that I could find!

** One last riveting tip: if (like me) you choose to not put the Crafted Findings tool into a vise (as the manufacturer recommends), hold it flat on the edge of your tabletop. It will help ensure that everything stays lined up correctly when you flare that rivet!

***Or, if you have the standard 1/16″ setup, you could purchase the long-reach body with 3/32″ attachments. The convenience of not swapping out parts will easily pay for the extra tool purchase.