Posts Tagged ‘mixed metal jewelry’

Create a Hinged Metal Memory Journal

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

Use a hinge to turn shrine-shaped metal blanks into a journal!

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Hinged Book Necklace made with shrine-shaped metal blanks

Decide on the layout, location of the hinge and other decorative elements. Using a checkered hammer, apply texture to the top and bottom panels of the journal. Patina, file rough edges and clean.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Layout

Cut the hinges, which can be as wide or as narrow as you choose. For 3/32 tubing, make hinges that are one-half inch deep. You need an odd number of hinge tabs. Measure, mark and saw tabs into the top panel. Use plenty of cut lube to prevent the saw blade from sticking when cornering.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Create Hinge Tabs

Using wide, flat nose pliers, crease and fold each tabs up to a 90 degree angle. The position of the fold determines whether the hinge will be visible from the front of the pendant, or only from the back side. Keep the textured sides face up, so the design is consistent.
Carefully roll tabs into cylinders using chain nose pliers or medium bail making pliers. Leave hinges a bit loose until after you have inserted the tubing, then you can tighten for best fit.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Roll Into Cylinders

Use a tube cutting jig to cut a length of tube 1mm longer than the width of your piece (for 1/2mm on each side).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Cut Tubing

Slide tubing down the channel and finesse hinges as needed. Rivet tubing into place to finish the hinge. Open and close hinge to ensure a proper fit.

This free DIY jewelry design by Sondra Barrington features antique brass, nickel silver, metal etching, dapping and creating hinges.

Assemble Hinge and Insert Tubing

Working with the bottom panel, lay out etched metal pieces for the cover and inside page. Cut, file and patina as necessary. Leave sufficient room for the hinge to lay flat against the bottom panel.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Lay out Etched Metal Page

Measure, mark and punch holes for decorative rivets, accents and center piece (using the small side of the hole punch).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Prepare Embellishments

Using two-part epoxy, carefully glue the etched metal panels into place.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting. Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design. The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Lay out Etched Metal Page

Using a dapping set, dome two small round shapes that can nest one inside the other. Patina, file away any rough edges and clean the domed metal. Layer, and rivet domed metal nests onto the top panel. Connect top and bottom panel with rivets. Use a tube rivet at the top so that you can thread a jump ring through it (if you choose).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Rivet Domes Into Place

Carefully clean and polish the pendant before attaching the necklace chain.

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Clean Finished Pendant

Handmade jewelry looks great on a custom beaded necklace, on leather cording, silk ribbon or chain. I created a necklace by making individual links using the one-step looping plier, eye pins, metal beads and natural agates. The links were connected using jump rings.

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Memory Journal Necklace

This free DIY Memory Journal pendant was created by designer Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This necklace features riveting, metal etching, antique brass shrine stamping blanks, dapping, and metal stamping. The chain was created in an ombre pattern using natural agate gemstone beads, TierraCast antique brass bead caps, metal heishi trade beads and the one-step looping plier with antique copper head pins.

Easy Elegant Earrings

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

Easy Elegant Earrings

Using one-step looping pliers and a few supplies, you can have a set of fantastic earrings in under 30 minutes!

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Step One:

Gather supplies

Free simple DIY earring project!  All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Step Two:

Lay out pattern and mark paddles

Free simple DIY earring project!  All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Step Three:

Loop paddle-end head pins

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Step Four:

Adjust and tighten loops

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Step Five:

Assemble

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

Step Six:

Repeat for other earring & enjoy!

Free simple DIY earring project! All supplies available at www.rings-things.com.

 

For more information, scroll down to see the video tutorial and review tips on this one-step looping pliers page.

Vintaj Road Trip Design Challenge!

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

vintaj rings & things road trip design challengeHi bloglandia! We are really excited to be partnering with Vintaj for their Summer Road Trip design challenge this month. Visit their blog to see the great jewelry their designers created by pairing beads & components from Rings & Things with Vintaj products. The Vintaj blog also has all the details about how to enter the contest! Submissions are due by NOON (CST) Friday, June 29. But wait – don’t go yet!

Over the next couple of weeks we’ll share some of our own Summer Road Trip jewelry pieces, starting with Sondra’s “The Trail Less Traveled” bracelet:

trail-less-traveled-bracelet

This mixed metal bracelet contains all kinds of mementos!

She used so many fun techniques that I’m sure I’ll miss a few, but here are the highlights:

decoemboss-vintaj

The Vintaj luggage tags were DecoEmbossed with the Sizzix BigKICK. Sondra punched holes to in the tags to link them with textured locking jump rings.

postcard-bracelet

She curved the postcard charm and souvenir penny using bracelet bending pliers.

vintaj-bee-soldered-crystal

The Vintaj bee and several other charms have the tips of rhinestone crystal head pins soldered onto them for extra bling.

vintaj-turtle-charm

The memoir stamp bezel from Vintaj is filled with a scrap of map coated with SuperClear resin.

vintaj-leaf-crystal-clasp

The rest of the sparklies are from our Karma Chameleon Crystal Jam. Check out our Crystal Jam color themed design boards on Pinterest!

Ok. Now you can go get started on your own Summer Road Trip design challenge piece! We can’t wait to see what you create! ~ Cindy

Riveting tool comparison – long reach vs. standard

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011
riveted-jewelry

One of these things is not like the others…

Hello, bloglandia! Today, I failed repeatedly at the project I undertook with the Crafted Findings semi-tubular riveting tool. But, as many wise people have stated, wisdom rarely comes from success. It is our failures that we learn the most from. And besides, these particular failures were actually wins in a way.

Top: standard riveting tool. Bottom: Long-reach version.

The riveting tool by Crafted Findings is now available in both regular and long-reach models.* “Long reach” is a misnomer, in my opinion – the tool doesn’t reach any further from the edge of a piece (darn!). Instead, the tool opening is 0.2″ (5mm) “deeper” (taller) which allows thicker pieces to be stacked and riveted together.

The Crafted Findings riveting setup is really quite nifty. When you make rivets the traditional way, there is a lot work involved in making the holes the right size for the rivets, and the rivets the right size and height for the holes. This tool eliminates that challenge. Simply pierce the metal with one side of the tool, then set the rivet with the other side. All the parts are designed to fit perfectly together. Here is a sneak peek at the instruction book included with the tool.

I’ve used the standard tool on several thin brass fairy door pieces, but nothing very thick. So, my goal today was to make something that could only be riveted with the new long reach riveting tool.

Riveted enameled copper ring. I stamped “eternal” on the band – hoping for eternal summer I guess!

First, I made a ring using C-Koop enameled flowers and a 1/4″ strip of copper sheet metal. It seemed like it was fairly thick (about 1/3″ or 9mm at the outside high points), but it actually fit just fine in the standard riveting tool. (I did have to use an eyelet instead of a rivet, though – the longest eyelet available is 7/32″, while the rivets only go up to 5/32″.)

Be gentle when you rivet breakable items – enamel is a coating of glass, so it can crack if you are overly enthusiastic with the rivet tool.

Second, I made a ring using a domed brass disk, a domed copper gear and a strip of copper. Seemed thick! But again, I was able to rivet it together with the standard tool (and a 5/32″ rivet). (My rivet is kinda squashed looking – unfortunately, the only way to rivet rings is with the unfinished side up. Normally I put the tube side of the rivet on the back of a piece in case it doesn’t look so nice. It is less likely to look squashed if you have the correct length rivet, too. And I learned…**)

Get in Gear – domed copper and brass.

By now I was both pleased and annoyed: pleased that the standard riveting tool is actually quite versatile, yet annoyed that I had failed at my mission. I didn’t want to make my own eyelets from tubing, so my project needed to fit the 7/32″ eyelet, yet be taller than the standard riveting tool.

The coin already had this lovely patina right out of the bag, so I left the raw brass elements plain for contrast.

Third time’s a charm! I stacked a pin back, brass petal wheel, Chinese coin, domed brass gear and a couple rivet accents together for this pin. Too tall for the standard riveting tool, yet short enough at the center to fit a 7/32″ eyelet. Finally!

The back of the pin – just one eyelet secures it all together. No glue!

Once I found the magic combination of parts, I began thinking of all types of designs where the “long reach” riveting tool would be handy. 3/32″ long-reach attachments are coming soon, so if you haven’t purchased a Crafted Findings riveting system yet, I’d recommend getting the long reach version.*** For a couple extra bucks, it will ensure you have the most design options. But, as my failures demonstrate, there is still a lot you can do with the standard riveting tool!

This picture shows the height difference between the long reach and regular riveting tools.

Have you made something with the Crafted Findings riveting tool? We’d love to see pictures! ~Cindy

_________________

*The tool is also available in both 1/16″ and 3/32″ diameter options. I used 1/16″ for all of my examples today, but if you plan to use your eyelet holes as connection points (like for jump rings), get the 3/32″ size components (sold separately). Only very fine gauge wire will fit through the 1/16″ eyelets, and no jump rings that I could find!

** One last riveting tip: if (like me) you choose to not put the Crafted Findings tool into a vise (as the manufacturer recommends), hold it flat on the edge of your tabletop. It will help ensure that everything stays lined up correctly when you flare that rivet!

***Or, if you have the standard 1/16″ setup, you could purchase the long-reach body with 3/32″ attachments. The convenience of not swapping out parts will easily pay for the extra tool purchase.