Posts Tagged ‘designer jewelry’

Create a Charm Bracelet

Monday, January 13th, 2014

 Charm Bracelet

Moondance, a free DIY bracelet project, using sterling silver, keishi pearls and faceted Swarovski crystal beads was designed by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This handmade jewelry design features flower, petal and leaf bead caps made of sterling silver as well as center drilled keishi pearls in a beautiful shimmering silvery gray/light blue color. Free instructions for creating this handmade, heirloom quality charm bracelet at www.rings-things.com.

Create a beautiful, heirloom-quality charm bracelet using freshwater keishi pearls, Swarovski faceted crystal beads, and unique sterling silver bead caps,  charms, and findings.

A four-piece jewelry making tool set and basic assembly techniques are all you need to create this stunning bracelet. I recommend using the Chain Stā tool which suspends the bracelet horizontally making it easier to see where you are placing charms.

Create Eight Styles of Charms

For this design, charms were arranged in the following pattern:

  1. Place an Ethereal Pearl Charm every 5 links.
  2. On the 3rd link after Ethereal Pearl, attach  Oopsy Daisy Charm.
  3. On the 4th link after Ethereal Pearl, alternate Falling Leaf & Delicate Sprout Charms.
  4. On the 1st link after Ethereal Pearl, alternate Tender Bloom & Budding Flower Charms.
  5. On the 2nd link after Ethereal Pearl, alternate Cherry Blossom & Fresh Shoot Charms.

Ethereal Pearl Charm

The ethereal pearl charm features  freshwater center-drilled keishi pearl and a sterling silver ball-end head pin (available at www.rings-things.com.)

Create 7 Ethereal Pearl Charms using:
Center-Drilled Freshwater Keishi Pearl
2″ Ball End Head Pins
4mm Round Jump Rings

Oopsy Daisy Charm

The oopsy daisy charm features a Swarovski faceted crystal bead, a sterling silver four leaf bead cap, and a sterling silver ball-end head pin (available at www.rings-things.com.)

Create 6 Oopsy Daisy Charms using:

Falling Leaf Charm

The falling leaf charm features a Swarovski pearl, a sterling silver leaf charm, and a sterling silver ball-end head pin (available at www.rings-things.com.)
Create 3 Falling Leaf Charms using:

Delicate Sprout Charm

 The delicate sprout charm features a Swarovski pearl, a sterling silver flower charm, a sterling silver flower bead cap, and a sterling silver ball-end head pin (available at www.rings-things.com.)

Create 3 Delicate Sprout Charms using:
Sterling Silver Flower Bead Cap
3mm Swarovski Round Crystal Pearl Beads
2″ Sterling Silver Ball End Head Pins
4mm Round Sterling Silver Jump Rings
Sterling Silver Pansy Charms

Create a Custom Personalized Necklace

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Personalized jewelry is very popular, and quite simple to create!   A four-piece jewelry making tool set and basic assembly techniques are all you need to create custom necklaces.

Earth Mother, a custom mother's necklace includes birthstone charms, a butterfly charm and three flowers on a silver charm.  This free DIY custom memory necklace project by Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com features sterling silver, swarovski crystal, gemstones and personalized charms.This free DIY custom memory necklace project by Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com features sterling silver, swarovski crystal, gemstones and personalized charms.

(Click for larger image)

It is easy to personalize jewelry using birthstone-color gemstones and Swarovski crystal, along with a sterling silver charm or two. Rings & Things sells a huge selection of lightweight budget-friendly sterling charms and necklace chains.

Add-a-dangle using faceted, round, cube and other shaped gemstones!  This free DIY custom memory necklace project by Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com features sterling silver, swarovski crystal, gemstones and personalized charms.

Chains are easily adorned with add-a-dangle, or add-a-gemstone charms.  To create these assorted dangles, you just need a selection of small beads from your stash and some sterling ball-end head pins.

Blessed Mother Necklace features gemstone beads and a cube bead as the birthstone charms and a sterling silver fish faith charm. This free DIY custom memory necklace project by Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com features sterling silver, swarovski crystal, gemstones and personalized charms.

(Click for larger image)

These colorful  dangles allow you to add several birthstones to a custom piece, or accessorize it according the whimsy of the wearer.  A mixture of natural stones, freshwater pearls and Swarovski crystals is very popular.  Making oversized loops on the dangles makes it easy to slide them onto nearly any chain without adding a jump ring.

Add-a-dangle birthstone charms of Swarovski round crystals! This free DIY custom memory necklace project by Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com features sterling silver, swarovski crystal, gemstones and personalized charms.

If you sell custom necklaces, consider displaying the basics in a fun display (along with a few completed samples):

  • A tray of sterling silver charms
  • An assortment of pre-made add-a-gemstone dangles
  • A variety of pre-made add-a-birthstone crystal dangles
  • A few styles of sterling silver necklace chains.
This necklace, Adorable Auntie, includes charms representing each niece and nephew! This free DIY custom memory necklace project by Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com features sterling silver, swarovski crystal, gemstones and personalized charms.

(Click for larger image)

This jewelry also makes great gifts and mementos for friends, family and other loved ones.  Have fun making these darling necklaces!

How to Make a Metal Box

Monday, October 28th, 2013

Make A Metal Box

A small metal box was turned into a framed reliquary, containing an antiqued frozen Charlotte doll. Create your own metal box that can be transformed into memory jewelry, a tiny shrine or used for some other whimsical (or practical) purpose.

Free jewelry project from www.rings-things.com by designer Sondra Barrington features a verdigris frozen Charlotte nested inside an antique brass framed reliquary box.

To make a metal box, first decide on the type of metal, and the size of the box you want to create. I recommend using 20 gauge sheet metal for strength and durability. Copper or brass sheet metal are nice choices as they are inexpensive and they antique nicely.

Anneal the metal before cutting so that it can be manipulated more easily. Heat it with a torch until it is glowing red, let it cool naturally and clean thoroughly.

Anneal the metal for malleability.  Be sure to clean it thoroughly afterward!

Cut the metal to size. This box was 1-1/2″ long and 3/4″ wide. It is 3/8″ deep. Draw lines of box using a Sharpie pen.

Draw lines for the metal box using a Sharpie pen.

Cut one line of each corner to the point where it intersects with another line. Using wide flat nose pliers, bend the ends in, and the sides up, to create the box shape. Carefully fold each end of the box into place, making the corners square and secure. File if needed to remove any uneven edges.

Fold ends together, snugly into place to create each end of the box.

Antique and colorize all parts you intend to assemble.

Antique and patina the frozen charlotte doll, the ornate brass frame and the brass metal box to create the reliquary.

Fill back of frame with two-part epoxy. Center box over ornate brass frame and press into epoxy to place.

Fill back of ornate brass frame with two-part epoxy.  Attach frame to top of box when epoxy is nearly set.

Using a two-part epoxy, UV resin, jeweler’s grade resin or other strong, clear glue, embed your treasures into your framed metal reliquary. Small toys, souvenirs, images layered in resin and tiny mementos are all used in creating custom memory jewelry.

Once epoxy has cured, you are ready to embed your treasure into the framed metal box.

Use epoxy to attach a magnet, let it cure and you are done! (Note: You could also attach a pin back or changeable bail in the same manner for a DIY jewelry brooch or pendant).

Use epoxy to attach a magnet to the back side of your brass reliquary.

 

How to Make Leather Bracelets – Two Finishing Methods

Monday, August 12th, 2013
Learn to make leather bracelets with these easy finishing methods,

Create two styles of leather bracelets using these do-it-yourself jewelry-making techniques.

 

In this do-it-yourself jewelry-making tutorial, the bracelet blanks from last weeks blog post, “Customizing Tim Holtz idea-ology® Word Bands for a Handmade Look”, combine with Rings & Things’ new leather strips to make two styles of leather cuffs.

 

How to make a leather bracelet with metal stamped word band blanks.

Combine a customized bracelet blank with one of the many colors of Rings & Things’ leather strips to create a handmade leather bracelet.

 

Leather Bracelet Style One – A Single-Wrap Bracelet with Drawstring Clasp:

“In the Moment Leather Cuff Bracelet”

Tutorial: how to make a leather bracelet with drawstring clasp; a step-by-step DIY jewelry project.

Step 1: Gather together the supplies you will need to make a drawstring clasp leather bracelet.

You will need the following tools and supplies:

ruler

cutting mat

Sharpie®, Extra Fine Point

hobby knife

rotary leather hole punch

1/2″ wide leather strip

3mm suede lace

5-ply waxed linen cord

large-hole bead (hole size 4mm)

customized Tim Holtz idea-ology® word bands

 

Make a DIY leather bracelet: Cut the leather strip with a hobby knife.

Step 2: Cut the leather strip to length. Size the leather so it fits comfortably on the wrist, ends butted together; mark the leather at the cut length. Use a ruler and hobby knife to make a straight cut at the mark.

 

Tutorial Leather Strip Bracelet D

Step 3: Measure and mark the position of the holes to be punched (it is easiest to do this before you curve the word band). Mark two “stitching” holes on either side of the two word-band loops. Also mark a “lacing” hole set 1/4th inch from each leather end.

 

How to make holes in leather with a rotary leather hole punch.

Step 4: Use a rotary leather hole punch to cut holes in the leather strip at the marked positions. Use the smallest punch (2mm) to punch the stitching holes for the bracelet blank; use the largest punch (4.5mm) to punch the lacing holes for the drawstring closure.

 

How to attach a metal-stamped bracelet blank to a leather cuff using waxed linen cord.

Step 5: Align the bracelet blank with the punched stitching holes and stitch each side in place. The waxed linen cording is stiff enough to go through the 2mm holes without a needle. After making two or three stitches, pull the cord tight and secure with a knot on the backside of the bracelet.

 

How to make an adjustable drawstring closure for a leather cuff bracelet.

Step 6: To create the drawstring closure, lace the suede cord through one hole and then back out, so the cord tails are on the outside of the cuff. String both cord ends through the large hole bead. Combine both cord ends and make an overhand knot approximately 2″ from the cuff. Slide the bead to tighten or loosen the cuff.

 

How to use a drawstring closure on a handmade leather cuff.

“Live in the Moment” leather-cuff bracelet with drawstring clasp is ready to wear.

 

Leather Bracelet Style Two – A Double-Wrap Bracelet with Hitch Clasp:

“The Journey Leather Wrap Bracelet”

 

How to make a double-wrap leather cuff bracelet--you will need these  supplies.

Step 1: Gather together the supplies you will need to make a double-wrap leather cuff bracelet with hitch fastener.

You will need the following tools and supplies:

ruler

cutting mat

Sharpie®, Extra Fine Point

hobby knife

rotary leather hole punch

screwdriver

1/2″ wide leather strip

idea-ology®, Hitch Fasteners

5-ply waxed linen cord

customized Tim Holtz idea-ology® word bands

 

How to make a double-wrap bracelet cuff--size and cut the leather strip.

Step 2: Cut the leather strip to length. Size the leather so it fits comfortably wrapped twice around the wrist; add one inch for the closure overlap. Mark the leather at the cut length. Use a ruler and hobby knife to make a straight cut at the mark.

 

How to make a leather cuff bracelet--measuring and marking for hole punching.

Step 3: Measure and mark the position of the holes to be punched (it is easiest to do this before you curve the word band). Place the leather on your wrist and determine approximate placement for the metal blank. Mark two “stitching” holes on either side of the two word-band loops. Also mark a “hitch” hole set 1/4th inch from the first leather end and 1/2 inch from the second end.

 

How to make a leather cuff bracelet--punching holes for a hitch fastener closure.

Step 4: Use a rotary leather hole punch to create holes in the leather strip at the marked positions. Use the smallest punch (2mm) to punch the stitching holes for the bracelet blank; use the largest punch (4.5mm) to punch the fastener holes for the hitch closure.

 

How to attach a metal-stamped bracelet blank to a leather cuff using waxed linen cord.

Step 5: Align the bracelet blank with the punched stitching holes and use waxed linen cord to attach the word band blank to the bracelet. Stitch the blank in place and knot the cord on the back side. For ease, a large sewing needle can be used.

 

How to make a hitch style clasp for a DIY leather cuff bracelet.

Step 6 a: On one end hole insert the screw side of the hitch fastener.

 

How to make a hitch style clasp for a DIY leather cuff bracelet.

Step 6 b: Attach and screw the hitch in place. From the backside, use a flat-head screw driver to tighten the hitch.

 

How to make a hitch style clasp for a DIY leather cuff bracelet.

Step 7 a: On the other end hole, use the hobby knife to cut 1/8″ slits on opposite sides of the hole, running parallel to the strip length. This will allow the hitch to slip into the hole, but stay securely in place.

 

How to make a hitch style clasp for a DIY leather cuff bracelet.

Step 7 b: Insert the hitch through the hole to close the fastener.

 

How to make a leather wrap bracelet with metal stamped blank --ready to wear.

“The Journey Leather Wrap Bracelet” is ready to wear!

 

Layer bracelets for a trendy look.

Bracelets can be worn together for a layered look.

 

Make things,

Mollie

 

Concrete in Jewelry

Monday, July 29th, 2013

 

Free tips for using Artisan Encapture Concrete and other jewelry grade concretes for mini mosaics, art concrete projects, concrete jewelry and more by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.

An industrial material such as concrete seems unlikely for jewelry, but it works very well! It is relatively lightweight, and very durable. It is great for personalized adornment, because you can embed virtually any charm, bead or found object you want.

Visit our design gallery for free jewelry projects and check our Mosaic Jewelry Board on Pinterest for concrete jewelry inspirations.

 

Difference Between Cement and Concrete

Cement is a powdered ingredient (mostly calcium silicates) used in concrete. It is strong, but brittle and susceptible to scratching. When mixed with water, it undergoes a series of chemical reactions and slowly crystallizes into a strong, interlocking form. Concrete is a mixture of cement, an aggregate (sand or gravel) and water.

Free tips for using Artisan Encapture Concrete and other jewelry grade concretes for mini mosaics, art concrete projects, concrete jewelry and more by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.

cement powder

Jewelry Grade Concrete

EuroTool created EnCapture Artisan Concrete  specifically for jewelry artists. This new kit makes it easy for designers to create small mosaics and concrete jewelry. For information on making your own concrete, visit Ganoksin.

Creating with Artisan Concrete

Tips on Using EnCapture Artisan Concrete

Storage of the product is critical.  Extreme temperatures may affect the mixture or compound, and can jeopardize the integrity of the activator liquid. For best results store in a dry, cool location and don’t freeze.  Keeping the compound dry is essential; once moisture is introduced the chemical reaction starts.  Store products in closed containers.  The shelf life, when stored properly, is one year (if not longer).

Coloring Concrete

Prismacolor colored pencils can be used to color the surface of concrete! To prepare the surface, wet-sand it using fine-grit, wet/dry sandpaper and let dry for 24 hours. To seal the color, spray with several light coats of Krylon UV sealant.

Free tips for using Artisan Encapture Concrete and other jewelry grade concretes for mini mosaics, art concrete projects, concrete jewelry and more by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.

Prismacolor Pencils 

Safety When Using Concrete in Jewelry

Always use disposable cups and utensils. Throw away unused concrete; do not wash it down the drain (it will clog pipes). Wear a respirator, safety glasses and gloves.

Have Fun & Happy Creating!

Create a Hinged Metal Memory Journal

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

Use a hinge to turn shrine-shaped metal blanks into a journal!

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Hinged Book Necklace made with shrine-shaped metal blanks

Decide on the layout, location of the hinge and other decorative elements. Using a checkered hammer, apply texture to the top and bottom panels of the journal. Patina, file rough edges and clean.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Layout

Cut the hinges, which can be as wide or as narrow as you choose. For 3/32 tubing, make hinges that are one-half inch deep. You need an odd number of hinge tabs. Measure, mark and saw tabs into the top panel. Use plenty of cut lube to prevent the saw blade from sticking when cornering.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Create Hinge Tabs

Using wide, flat nose pliers, crease and fold each tabs up to a 90 degree angle. The position of the fold determines whether the hinge will be visible from the front of the pendant, or only from the back side. Keep the textured sides face up, so the design is consistent.
Carefully roll tabs into cylinders using chain nose pliers or medium bail making pliers. Leave hinges a bit loose until after you have inserted the tubing, then you can tighten for best fit.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Roll Into Cylinders

Use a tube cutting jig to cut a length of tube 1mm longer than the width of your piece (for 1/2mm on each side).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Cut Tubing

Slide tubing down the channel and finesse hinges as needed. Rivet tubing into place to finish the hinge. Open and close hinge to ensure a proper fit.

This free DIY jewelry design by Sondra Barrington features antique brass, nickel silver, metal etching, dapping and creating hinges.

Assemble Hinge and Insert Tubing

Working with the bottom panel, lay out etched metal pieces for the cover and inside page. Cut, file and patina as necessary. Leave sufficient room for the hinge to lay flat against the bottom panel.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Lay out Etched Metal Page

Measure, mark and punch holes for decorative rivets, accents and center piece (using the small side of the hole punch).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Prepare Embellishments

Using two-part epoxy, carefully glue the etched metal panels into place.
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting. Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design. The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Lay out Etched Metal Page

Using a dapping set, dome two small round shapes that can nest one inside the other. Patina, file away any rough edges and clean the domed metal. Layer, and rivet domed metal nests onto the top panel. Connect top and bottom panel with rivets. Use a tube rivet at the top so that you can thread a jump ring through it (if you choose).
Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Rivet Domes Into Place

Carefully clean and polish the pendant before attaching the necklace chain.

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Clean Finished Pendant

Handmade jewelry looks great on a custom beaded necklace, on leather cording, silk ribbon or chain. I created a necklace by making individual links using the one-step looping plier, eye pins, metal beads and natural agates. The links were connected using jump rings.

Hinged Pendant Memory Journal created by Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things.  This free DIY jewelry project features metal etching, metal stamping, dapping and riveting.  Antique brass, nickel silver, copper and natural agate were used in creating this design.  The one-step looping plier was used for the handmade chain.

Memory Journal Necklace

This free DIY Memory Journal pendant was created by designer Sondra Barrington of Rings & Things. This necklace features riveting, metal etching, antique brass shrine stamping blanks, dapping, and metal stamping. The chain was created in an ombre pattern using natural agate gemstone beads, TierraCast antique brass bead caps, metal heishi trade beads and the one-step looping plier with antique copper head pins.

How to Make a Lashed Chain & Leather Bracelet

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013
Lashed wrapped leather and chain bracelets.

Single-wrap & double-wrap lashed chain & leather bracelets.

Lashed wrapped leather bracelets aren’t just popular because they look great — they’re also a hit because once you know a couple tricks to get started, they are an easy and fun DIY jewelry project to make!

The main difference between lashing chain to leather and lashing beads to leather is that chain doesn’t have “hidden” holes to allow you to work down both sides of the leather at the same time. So, when lashing chain, you’ll lash one side of the chain and leather first, then lash the second side.

Lashed chain and leather bracelet

“Tree of Life” Lashed Chain & Leather Bracelet

Supplies:

***Tips for picking your chain:

  • Choose a style that will lay flat!
  • Choose a style with links that are large enough to easily thread the needle through.
Choose from several styles of chain.

For the bracelets pictured, I used:
7.6mm double-oval curb chain (#40-099-57) and
6mm hammered curb chain (#40-099-04).

Cut your chain:
Wear safety glasses or goggles! It’s not unusual for a cut chain link to fly up or out.

Cut the chain 2 inches shorter than your final bracelet length:

  • For a 7.5” bracelet, cut 5.5” of chain.
  • For a 15” (double-wrap) bracelet, cut 13” of chain.
  • For a 22.5” (triple-wrap) bracelet, cut 20.5” of chain.
Choose from several colors of leather cord.

For both bracelets pictured, I used
2mm wide Greek leather cord.

Cut your leather cord:
Cut the cord 2x the length of your finished bracelet, plus about 12 additional inches:

  • For a 7.5” bracelet, cut 27” of leather.
  • For a 15” (double-wrap) bracelet, cut 42” of leather.
  • For a 22.5” (triple-wrap) bracelet, cut 60” of leather.

 

Size D Super-Lon.

Size D Super-Lon comes in several pretty colors.

Cut your threads:
You will use two separate pieces of thread to lash your chain to your leather, one for each side. A good general rule for each side is to calculate 3x the length of the bracelet, add 5-10 more inches for good measure, and double that:

  • For a 7.5” bracelet, cut two 54” threads.
  • For a 15” (double-wrap) bracelet, cut two 100” threads.
  • For a 22.5” (triple-wrap) bracelet, cut two 155” threads.

To get started:
Thread your button onto the center of your cut piece of leather.

Thread one needle onto the middle of your first length of thread, and knot the ends. Repeat with your second length of thread and your second needle.

Secure the thread:
This method will keep the ends of your threads from loosening up and/or sliding down the leather cord once the bracelet is done.

  1. Loop your first thread around the LEFT side of the leather cord, and back through itself, creating a lark’s head knot. Tighten right under the button.
  2. How to make a lark's head knot.

    Lark’s Head Knot

  3. Create a second lark’s head knot with your second thread around the RIGHT side of the leather cord. Tighten.
  4. Attaching your thread to your leather using lark's head knots.

    Tie both threads to your leather using lark’s head knots.

  5. Create a single overhand knot with both sides of the leather AND both threads together. Pull taut under the button.
Creating an overhead knot.

Then, combine both sides of leather and both threads into a single overhand knot.

Attach your button to a sturdy work surface (a clip board works great). Now, wrap the left-hand thread several times around both leather cords in a figure-8 (infinity) pattern.

Figure-8 or infinity wrap.

How to wrap your thread in a figure-8 (infinity) pattern around both sides of your leather cord.

Infinity or figure-8 wrap.

Now, the first thread is wrapped.

Repeat with the right-hand thread. Use the needle to intersperse the right-hand thread with the wraps already made by the left-hand thread.

Creating the second half of your infinity wrap.

You can use your needle to intersperse the second thread with the first thread.

Tightly knot both threads together on what will be the BACK (underside) of the bracelet. Now your threads are secured for lashing.

Lashing:
Move the right-hand piece of leather and right-hand thread out of the way. NOTE: If it feels more natural for you to start on the right side, then move the left-hand leather and thread out of the way instead. The important thing is to lash only one side of the bracelet at a time.

Lay your cut chain in the middle between the two sides of leather cord. If you find that your chain likes to roll to one side, use masking tape to secure the bottom of the chain and leather in place while you lash.

Use masking tape to secure your chain.

Secure the bottom of your chain and leather to keep the chain laying flat while you lash.

Begin to lash by bringing your needle UP through the first chain link, and then OVER the left side of the chain link. Continue OVER and around the leather cord, then UP through the next link. Pull tight.

I like to lash the first link twice, to give it extra hold, and then commence with one lash for subsequent links. (If you want to double lash every link, you will need to cut more thread than described above!)

Starting to lash.

Double lash the first 1 or 2 links, then single lash each link after that.

Stay on one side, and continue lashing each chain link to your leather. It’s normal for the thread to go slack and the top of the chain to slip a bit as you get started. Adjust it as needed, and keep going. Every once in awhile, check the tension of the lashes and keep them consistent. … Once you get a rhythm going, lashing is fun and easy!

Lashing pattern.

Continue the same pattern you started with: UP through the chain link, then OVER the leather.

TIP: When you’re making a double or triple wrapped bracelet, the threads will seem really long to start with. To help prevent them from getting knotted or otherwise caught up, use your thumb and fingers to keep the thread taut as you pull it through.

When you get to the end of the chain, double lash the final link, then wrap the thread around the leather a few times.

Finishing the first side of lashing.

At the end of the first side, double lash the final link, then wrap your thread around the leather a few times.

If the chain has slid down from it’s starting place, adjust as necessary.

Add a Bead Stopper or binder clip to the bottom of your first side, to hold the thread in place. Do NOT trim the thread or remove the needle. You will finish the ends of both sides at the same time.

Using a Bead Stopper.

A Bead Stopper works great to temporarily hold your first side of lashing. Notice how the chain has moved down from the figure-8 wraps? I will adjust that before starting to lash the second side.

Binder Clip

A binder clip also works great.

The second side:
Lash the second side the same way. Double lash the first chain link, then single lash subsequent links. Double lash the final link and secure the second thread with another Bead Stopper or binder clip.

Lashing the second side.

Lashing the second side.

Finishing the End:
At this, point, make any adjustments needed in the tension of the overall design. Has the chain pulled away from the button end? Is the chain by the binder clips scrunched up?

After making any necessary adjustments, remove both binder clips, and create the same figure-8 (infinity) wraps that you made at the other end. Then, tie the opposing threads together, again on the back / underside.

Finishing with more figure 8's.

After you’ve completed lashing both sides, make more figure 8′s with both threads, then tie the threads together, as you did at the beginning.

Grab both thread ends and both leather ends. Tie a single overhand knot with all 4 ends together. As you tighten the knot, be careful to not let the chain get bunched up.

Finishing a lashed bracelet.

Make another overhand knot with both leather ends AND both ends of your thread.

Oops - scruched chain.

Oops! When I first tied my overhand knot, I tied it too tight, and the chain got scrunched up. If this happens, untie your knot and try again.

Trim the ends of the thread, and (optional) add a dab of glue for extra security.

Completing the clasp:
Use your button to determine where to make a second knot. This knot will create the loop part of your clasp.

Creating the clasp's loop.

Use your button to measure where to make a second overhand knot. This knot will create the loop end of your clasp.

Option: If there’s enough leather left, you can create a third knot to make an adjustable bracelet.

Option: once you’re done, add a dab of glue to all your knots for extra security.

Variation:
To add more color and create a slightly different look, thread an appropriate width of suede cord or ribbon through the chain once your bracelet is done. For the bracelet pictured below, I threaded 1.5mm imitation suede lace (#61-790) through 6mm hammered curb chain (#40-099-04).

Burgundy Bliss Bracelet

“Burgundy Bliss” single-wrap lashed chain & leather bracelet.

Happy lashing! Let us know what new variations you come up with. ~ Melissa

EnCapture Artisan Concrete

Monday, February 4th, 2013

We tested the new EnCapture Artisan Concrete Kit!

This “unique texture-rich medium for jewelry making is designed for embedding treasures such as glass, gemstones, metal, buttons, wire and beads to create visual interest and contrast.  Here are some tips for using it!

Mixing: We found the easiest way to mix the concrete was making a slurry (or thin paste) by putting a small amount of the base material in the mixing cup and adding the activator. To the slurry, mix in the base material and pigment incrementally until you have achieved the desired color and consistency.

Application:  You can extend the life of your concrete while you are working by covering the mixing cup with a damp paper towel. We recommend you remove excess concrete from your embedded treasures as you work using a damp paper towel, cotton swab or toothpick. It is easier to remove when it is moist than after it starts to dry.

Initial cleaning of the mini mosaic involves wiping away the excess jewelry grade concrete (Encapture Artisan Concrete) from the silver flower and rhinestone chain.  Remove any excess concrete from the back of the gunmetal bezel cup.  All parts available at rings-things.com

Work Time:  As the concrete starts setting within 5 minutes, you must work quickly!  Pre-arranging your design is very helpful.  We found it easiest to trace the bezel, and to mock-up the arrangement on paper.  This allows you to quickly and precisely place each item when it is time.   
Encapture Artisan Concrete (jewelry grade concrete) sets quickly.  The lampwork cat head bead and smaller gemstone round beads were positioned into place before the concrete was placed, making it easier to create a small mosaic.  All parts available at www.rings-things.com
Design:  Including small beads in your design is easiest if you string them first (this way they can’t roll and move as easily). For a more elaborate or mosaic-style design, setting your treasures with a dab of two-part epoxy glue is recommended. Glue your items in place and allow the glue to fully dry before applying concrete.  
Trade beads, a Tierra Cast hamsa hand, an Amate primitive heart or art heart (arte heart) silver bezel were carefully glued into place for this small mosaic.  The designer bezel will be filled with jewelry grade concrete (EnCapture Artisan Concrete) once the glue has dried.  Free DIY jewelry project by designer Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com.

Hamsa Hand in Heart Mosaic Necklace – Tutorial

Finishing Touches:  If you do not like large grains of sand from the concrete being visible in your design, you may be able to bury them by gently poking them down into the wet concrete with a toothpick.

Once the product has cured, for a beautiful golden sheen, the brass brush works wonders!  If you do not want to alter the color of your finished piece, gently clean around embedded treasures with the straight carver.

Using a toothpick to place jewelry grade concrete (Encapture Artisan Concrete) into the small mosaic, around the silver flower and rhinestone chain.  Carefully place the concrete to avoid getting it on the gunmetal bezel cup.  All parts available at rings-things.com

In addition to the tools and supplies provided in the kit, we found the following tools and supplies very helpful:
* Damp paper towels/moist towelettes
* Extra wood mixing sticks
* Cotton swabs
* Tablet & pencil
* Extra disposable plastic mixing cups
* Extra dust masks
* Extra disposable gloves
This free jewelry project by Sondra Barrington of www.rings-things.com features a silver Amate primitive heart bezel.  This deep dish art heart bezel has been filled with jewelry grade concrete (Encapture Artisan Concrete) and an assortment of trade beads, small silver beads and a Tierra Cast hamsa hand charm.  The mini mosiac is hung from an inexpensive choker.
Links:
  • The kit
  • Bezel Cups (for this concrete product, deeper bezels work better than shallow bezels)